Sarcasm in Literature | HowStuffWorks

 

sarcasm in literature

Sarcasm is ever present in literature, particularly in English literature. Sarcasm is a literary bed-fellow of satire and irony and is used almost exclusively as a humorous device. Sarcasm is used for many different reasons, often to simply subvert the original meaning of what . Oct 07,  · In this lesson, we will define sarcasm. We will then look at sarcasm in literature, including why an author would use sarcasm, the history of it in literature, and then some of the examples in. Sarcasm is often even less understood in online communication; ways of indicating sarcasm online include bolding the stressed word or phrase, putting it in quotation marks or even using faux tags like thanks. For lots more information about sarcasm Author: Shanna Freeman.


Sarcasm in literature, literary sarcasm : Shakespeare, The Bible


Sarcasm is a form of verbal irony that mocks, ridicules, or expresses contempt. Thanks sooooo much for all your heeeelp. Imagine someone saying this to a customer service agent, drawing out the syllables and maybe rolling their eyes. That verbal irony plus the mocking or derisive tone makes it sarcasm. I made the genius choice of selling my car right before I decided to move. It can also be humorous, playful, or as in this example self-deprecating.

Again, verbal irony plus the tone of voice makes this sarcasm. It would describe a way that one character talks to another. This can have all kinds of effects, but generally it shows that the speaker is being impatient or contemptuous. Sarcasm can say many different things about a character, depending on the way they use it, but most often sarcastic characters are cynical, slightly bitter, solitary, and perhaps arrogant.

Think, for example, of Dr. Cox from Scrubs — he often uses verbal irony to mock other characters in the sarcasm in literature, especially the protagonist, J. However, sarcasm in literature, like many sarcastic characters, Dr. Cox is more often brutally honest than sarcastic, sarcasm in literature. But it can still be sardonic and cynicalwhich are probably the two most common character traits expressed through the use of sarcastic dialogue.

Was there a lack of graves in Egypt, that you took us away to die in the wilderness? Exodus In one of the earliest examples of sarcasm, one of the Israelites walks up to Moses and poses this sarcastic question. If the Israelites were just going to die in the desert, then what was the point of leaving Egypt in the first place?

Shakespeare, Julius Caesar. Shakespeare imagines Mark Antony delivering sarcasm in literature thoroughly sarcastic speech at the funeral of Julius Caesar. Oh, just get a job? When someone tells Charlie that he needs to get a job, he launches into a bitterly sarcastic tirade about the suggestion.

Wesley famously uses this line to dismiss the intelligence of Vizzini the Sicilian. I take risks, sometimes patients die. House, House. House is another character who is frequently sardonic, and ocassionally sarcastic. Like Dr. Cox, his sardonicness usually takes the form of brutal honesty rather than sarcasm. Verbal irony is one of the components of sarcasm.

It just means saying the opposite of what one means. Verbal irony is always a feature of sarcasm. There is another type of irony, situational ironywhich refers to situations that violate our expectations in a humorous or striking way.

This is quite different from sarcasm in literature, and only tangentially related to verbal sarcasm in literature. However, the key difference is that a sardonic comment is not necessarily ironic, sarcasm in literature. It may say exactly what the speaker means, just in a mocking tone.

For example:. I did not attend the funeral, but I sent a letter saying I approved of it. Mark Twain. This comment by Twain is certainly mocking — it expresses his displasure with the deceased in a pretty biting fashion.

These days, cynicism usually refers to a self-centered and suspicious view of life. But, despite all these negative connotations of cynical people, they often make for extremely popular television characters. This is probably due to the fact that cynical, sardonic, and sarcastic lines are so good at producing a laugh. Sarcasm is often used sarcasm in literature ridicule or mock people, either jokingly or in earnest. In these situations, the sarcasm is also a form of satire.

Satire is the use of verbal irony, humor, or charicature to make fun of a person or institution, epseically in a political context. List of Terms Action. Ad Hominem. Alter Ego. APA Citation. Comic Relief. Deus ex machina. Double Entendre. Dramatic irony. Extended Metaphor. Fairy Tale. Figures of Speech. Literary Device. Pathetic Fallacy.

Plot Twist. Point of View, sarcasm in literature. Red Herring. Rhetorical Device. Rhetorical Question. Science Fiction. Self-Fulfilling Prophecy, sarcasm in literature. Turning Point, sarcasm in literature. Urban Legend. Literary Terms.

 

Examples of Sarcasm | Examples

 

sarcasm in literature

 

Sarcasm is often even less understood in online communication; ways of indicating sarcasm online include bolding the stressed word or phrase, putting it in quotation marks or even using faux tags like thanks. For lots more information about sarcasm Author: Shanna Freeman. Sarcasm is ever present in literature, particularly in English literature. Sarcasm is a literary bed-fellow of satire and irony and is used almost exclusively as a humorous device. Sarcasm is used for many different reasons, often to simply subvert the original meaning of what . Oct 07,  · In this lesson, we will define sarcasm. We will then look at sarcasm in literature, including why an author would use sarcasm, the history of it in literature, and then some of the examples in.